AK LNG

 

The AK LNG project got a slight boost from federal regulators this week. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, or FERC, will release its draft environmental impact statement a month ahead of schedule, in February next year.

Nikiski is identified as the best terminus for the Alaska Liquefied Natural Gas Pipeline Project submitted by the Alaska Gasline Development Corporation to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, and the Kenai Peninsula Borough wants to keep it that way.

At its meeting Tuesday, the borough assembly gave the administration the green light to apply for intervener status with the Federal Regulatory Commission as it considers AGDC’s AK LNG project. Having the status to intervene means the borough can weigh in on the project proposal with FERC. The deadline to apply to intervene is long past — May 1, 2017 — but the borough didn’t think that step was necessary at the time.

Now, though, other municipalities in the state are telling FERC the terminus should be somewhere other than Nikiski. John Quick, borough Mayor Charlie Pierce’s chief of staff, says the borough wants to be able to counter those claims.

 

This week, we’re talking about the AK LNG Project with the president of the Alaska Gasline Development Corporation, Keith Meyer and AGDC’s senior vice president of program management, Frank Richards.


Alaska Gasline Development Corporation

 

After years of waiting, Nikiski residents finally found out what path the Kenai Spur highway will take around the proposed AK LNG plant Wednesday night.

 

 

Alaska Gasline Development Corporation

 

The AK LNG project seems to be picking up some steam. A former partner in the project, BP, came back aboard last week with an agreement to supply North Slope gas to the 800-mile trans state pipeline.

Between trying to incorporate and trying to prepare for a possible natural gas project, there is a lot happening in Nikiski these days. On this week's Kenai Conversation, we'll get a North Road update and speak with Stacy Oliva and Dan Gregory with Incorporate Nikiski, and Nikiski's representative on the borough assembly Wayne Ogle.

 

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has announced when it will complete its environmental review of the AK LNG project. December 2019 is later than the Alaska Gasline Development Corporation had hoped, but for now, that hasn’t changed its operating schedule.

 

 


Alaska Gasline Development Corporation

 

The Alaska Gasline Development Corporation has extended the public comment period for the Kenai Spur Highway rerouting project.

Shaylon Cochran/KDLL

 

The Alaska LNG plant in Nikiski won’t be built with the Kenai Spur highway on its current path. Monday night, the Alaska Gasline Development Corporation was in town to talk about the options for relocating the Spur and take a few questions.

 

 


Alaska's economic future pretty much balances right now on a  natural gas pipeline running from the North Slope to Nikiski. It's the main focus of Governor Bill Walker's administration, and he's lobbied two presidents and several foreign leaders to get on board.

While the project is making progress through a recent agreement with China, it's far from a certainty, at least in the mind of local elder statesman John Williams.

 

The state may have a new dance partner for the AK LNG Project. Governor Bill Walker tweeted over the weekend about meetings he had with the heads of some North Slope producers.

AK LNG

 

The Alaska Gasline Development Corporation will be meeting in Nikiski next month, providing an update on the Alaska LNG project. Officials are hopeful prep work can begin this year.

 

 


Update on the Alaska liquefied natural gas pipeline project with Fritz Krusen, vice president for LNG, and Nick Szymoniak, LNG negotiator, of the Alaska Gasline Development Corporation.

The AK LNG Project continues forward, but not with the pace and fervor we saw when the project was first getting off the ground. The state of Alaska controls a bigger share of the project now, but doesn’t have a ton of extra money to put into it. And the economics are more difficult to make work with steady supplies of natural gas in the Lower 48 that are also a lot easier to get to. Larry Persily is chief of staff for borough Mayor Mike Navarre and this stuff is his specialty.