Latest Local news

 

A settlement has been reached between the Kenai Peninsula Borough, Mayor Charlie Pierce and the borough’s former Human Resources Director, Stormy Brown. The agreement was reached in mediation last month.

Jenny Neyman/KDLL

Close to 100, rainbow-bedecked people walked from the Soldotna Regional Sports Complex to Soldotna Creek Park Saturday afternoon as part of the Two Spirits Pride March and Celebration.

This is the second year for the event, held to raise awareness of and support for the area’s LGBTQ community. This year’s turnout was nearly double last year, and included LGBTQ people and allies. Meredith Harber, the pastor at Christ Lutheran Church in Soldotna, marched carrying a sign saying, “This pastor believes you are a beloved child of God.”

“I come because I’m an ally and I believe that all people deserve love and acceptance for who they are. I think it’s important because, especially in a small community, it allows support and love to be shown to people that sometimes feel like you need to hide. And so this is a great public expression of an accepting place for all people in our community,” Harber said.

The popularity of Soldotna Creek Park, with its music stage and ample room for vendors and fans, is evident to anyone who’s tried to find a parking spot in the vicinity on a Wednesday evening.

Some nearby businesses welcome off-hour use of their lots for park events, but Soldotna City Manager Stephanie Queen says others would rather not, and as such, the city is helping them out.

Alaska DOT

Travelers to the Kenai Peninsula should plan for delays during weekdays along Turnagain Arm for the rest of the month. The Alaska Department of Transportation is conducting analysis of the rock face between miles 104 and 114 of the Seward Highway, and that requires bucket trucks, cherry-pickers, ladders and maybe even some rappelling.

The owners of the former Agrium fertilizer plant in Nikiski could be close to deciding whether to restart the facility. But first, beer.

More News

KDLL Membership Drive Programs

The Native inhabitants of the Kenai Peninsula before Western contact were masters at adapting to this land. Dr. Alan Boraas, anthropology professor at Kenai Peninsula College, presented “Yaghanen, The Time Before,” a discussion about the lives of the Dena’ina people who have lived and thrived here for a thousand years, to the Kasilof Regional Historical Association.

Kenai River Brewing

Kenai River Brewing shares its plans for reopening Kenai Joe's in a special, live segment of the show. And speaking of reopening, Barnaby Brewing in Juneau tells Bill about recovering from a fire that shut them down for about a year.

More Membership Drive Programs

Kenai Conversation

  Join host Jay Barrett as we learn about the Hospice of the Central Peninsula with guests Janice Nightingale, executive director; board member Tony Oliver, and volunteer Karen Monell.

This week on the Kenai Conversation, host Jay Barrett welcomes folks from the Lee Shore Center in Kenai to talk about the operation of the crisis center and an important fundraiser coming up on Saturday. Present were Board Chair Mike Dimmick, Executive Director Cherrie Smith, board member Marti Slater, and Prevention Coordinator Rene Lipps.

More Conversations

KDLL Podcasts

KDLL's Jenny Neyman speaks with Lisa Maloney, author of "Day Hiking Southcentral Alaska," about becoming a guide book author and writing her new book. This show aired at 10 a.m. May 22. On May 23, Maloney gave an Adventure Talks presentation at the Kenai Visitors and Cultural Center, showing pictures and talking about trails in the region, as well as hiking safety, gear and more.

Join this month's Kenai Garden Talk to celebrate Alaska Agriculture Day, get a jump on local foods with a look at some spring harvestables and hear about an initiative to offer more agriculture opportunities in the Kenai Peninsula Borough.

Information from this episode:

Wild plant guides:

More Podcasts

Tumbledown House concert

Tumbledown House tickets

Join KDLL for a benefit concert with Tumbledown House at 9 p.m. June 25 at The Flats Bistro

Latest NPR News

In just five years, Slack has grown to have more than 10 million users and has become a verb in the process. "I'll Slack you" is shorthand for sending a message via the workplace chat platform.

On Thursday, the company will take that popularity to the New York Stock Exchange, where its shares will be publicly listed for the first time.

The recent discovery of the remains of the last slave ship to the United States is bringing hope of revival to Africatown. It's a small community in Mobile, Ala., founded by African captives brought on the Clotilde, thought to have arrived sometime in 1859 or 1860.

Lorna Woods' great-great-grandfather, Charlie Lewis, was brought to Mobile on the Clotilde. Now she tells his story as a volunteer with the local history museum.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2019 WSHU. To see more, visit WSHU.

Editor's note: This story contains graphic details of the actions leading up to Jamal Khashoggi's death.

A special U.N. investigator says Saudi Arabia's Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman should be investigated in the killing of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi because there is "credible evidence" that he and other senior officials in the kingdom were responsible.

More News