Jenny Neyman

General Manager

Jenny Neyman has been the general manager of KDLL since 2017. Before that she was a reporter and the Morning Edition host at KDLL.
She also worked in print journalism for 15 years, including 7.5 years as owner, publisher and editor of the Redoubt Reporter community newspaper in the central Kenai Peninsula.
She holds a bachelor's degree in journalism from Whitworth University in Spokane, WA, and grew up listening to KSTK public radio in Wrangell, AK.

Courtest USDA

There’s an experiment growing in the borough’s gravel pit in Cooper Landing and it’s ready for harvest.

“There was a project about two years ago that result in an area being reclaimed. And so we had this nice, flat surface that was freshly top-soiled, and we’re looking at what to do with it in the long term. And for a temporary measure, we did some barley trials,” said Marcus Meuller, land management officer for the Kenai Peninsula Borough.

Meuller said the department has been working toward an agriculture initiative to find ways to use borough land to make agriculture more available for residents, and the barley experiment fits right in.


KPBSD

Let’s get a little awkward, shall we, and discuss the birds and the bees. At least, the teaching of the birds and the bees, which has become a little more cumbersome since the passage of the Alaska Safe School Act. HB 156 went into effect in 2017 and requires school boards to review and approve outside presenters and materials used to teach sex ed, and grants parents the ability to opt their student out of any curriculum area or assessment.

Not all outside presenters and materials have to be approved by the school board. Historians, scientists, poets and so on, are still fine, only those teaching human reproduction. HB 156 had a controversial path into law. Some saw it as an attempt to limit sex ed, in a state where rates of sexually transmitted diseases and teen pregnancies rank among the highest in the nation. Others argued the additional scrutiny was a way to raise awareness and get parents and communities more involved in curriculum.

The Kenai Peninsula Borough’s school board had its yearly review of supplemental sex ed materials at its Aug. 6 meeting.


Emily Kwong/KCAW

Opioids like heroin affect the part of the brain that regulates breathing. An overdose depresses respiration to dangerous levels. Minutes, and even seconds, count in treating an overdose.

That’s why the U.S. Surgeon General is advocating greater awareness of the opioid antidote Naloxone, sold under its brand name, Narcan, which can counteract the effects of an overdose almost immediately.

Dr. Jerome Adams visited Kenai last week and sang the praises of Project Hope, a state program that provides Narcan kits to the public.

“First responders can’t typically get there in the four minutes it takes to get a hypoxic brain injury,” Adams said. “So if we want to turn around this opioid epidemic, if we want to avoid losing a generation, we need more people willing to carry naloxone with them, keep it in their homes. Because anyone can find themselves in the position to be first a responder.”


Jenny Neyman/KDLL

Candidates for the Northern Kenai Peninsula House District 29 agreed on more issues than not in a forum held by the Kenai and Soldotna Chambers of Commerce on Wednesday in Kenai. There were differences in priorities and approaches, however.

Ben Carpenter is a 1993 Nikiski High School graduate who is retiring from 21 years of military service this year. He has a peony farm with his family and works as project manager for Epperheimer, Inc., and says his lack of political experience is a mark in his favor.

“We cannot continue to do the same thing that we’ve always done. We cannot continue to think the same way that we’ve always thought and expect different results. We need people out of the communities who have never participated in politics to step forward and get involved. And that is the only way that we are going to right this state,” Carpenter said.

His first priority is cutting government.


KPBSD

Students head back to class next Tuesday in the Kenai Peninsula Borough School District. Let’s get ready with a little math.

At its Aug. 6 meeting, the Kenai Peninsula Borough School District Board of Education approved its fiscal year 2019 budget, which necessitated shaving about $523,000 from expenditures.

Many of the line items represent vacant positions that will not be filled, with duties shifting onto other departments or personnel. This includes $115,500 for a purchasing supervisor, $29,000 in school administration and $120,000 for a district art specialist.

Several school board members voiced heartburn over the loss of the art position.


Jenny Neyman/KDLL

The turnout for the big race Sunday in Soldotna was competitive with other major running events in the area — 110 preregistered racers and another 100 signed up at the start line. The course was laid out with plenty of signage and aid stations at the top of the incline and at the turnaround. And race swag was available so people could boast of their big athletic accomplishment.

If you looked closely, though, the distance printed on the braggy stickers and T-shirts was point 5 K. As in, a half a kilometer. A third of a mile. Sixteen hundred forty-ish feet, and every one of them for a good cause.

“We want to eradicate cancer, we want to raise money for programs and research and in about a hundred years or so, we don’ t want to hear anyone say, ‘You have cancer,’” said Johna Beech, event chair for the local Relay for Life organization.


Jenny Neyman/KDLL

In a small room of a little building on the Kenaitze Indian Tribe campus in Old Town Kenai, U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams heard a big message — comprehensive, integrated care is the way to treat those trapped in the opioid epidemic.

Dr. Adams was touring Alaska this week with a particular focus on learning how the opioid epidemic is affecting the state. He visited Kenai on Thursday specifically to tour the tribe’s Dena’ina Wellness Center and Henu’ Community Wellness Court.

“It would be incredibly presumptuous and, in my opinion, incredibly wrong of me to think that we can sit in Washington, D.C. and figure out what folks need in any part of the United States, and especially out in Alaska,” Adams said. “So it’s important to get out and find out what’s working well and what’s not working. And I’ve heard from many folks that the Wellness Center is an example of how to provide many services in an integrated way to individuals, and that’s why we came here.”


Jenny Neyman/KDLL

Three of the candidates hoping to become the Republican nominee for the governor’s race shared their views at a joint Kenai-Soldotna Chamber of Commerce forum Wednesday at the Soldotna Regional Sports Complex.

Former Lt. Gov. Mead Treadwell, former Mat-Su state Sen. Mike Dunleavy and Michael Sheldon shared their views on the state budget, economy, crime, fisheries and many other issues.


Megan learns just how smart pigs can be in "Pigs," by Robert Munsch, read by Sally Cassano.

Nikiski is identified as the best terminus for the Alaska Liquefied Natural Gas Pipeline Project submitted by the Alaska Gasline Development Corporation to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, and the Kenai Peninsula Borough wants to keep it that way.

At its meeting Tuesday, the borough assembly gave the administration the green light to apply for intervener status with the Federal Regulatory Commission as it considers AGDC’s AK LNG project. Having the status to intervene means the borough can weigh in on the project proposal with FERC. The deadline to apply to intervene is long past — May 1, 2017 — but the borough didn’t think that step was necessary at the time.

Now, though, other municipalities in the state are telling FERC the terminus should be somewhere other than Nikiski. John Quick, borough Mayor Charlie Pierce’s chief of staff, says the borough wants to be able to counter those claims.

Kenai Peninsula Borough

Tobacco users could be a source of additional revenue to the Kenai Peninsula Borough if the assembly approves an ordinance coming up for consideration.

Borough Assembly Member Willy Dunne, of Homer, would like to impose an excise tax on cigarettes and other tobacco products. The measure came before the assembly’s Policies and Procedures Committee on Tuesday. Committee Chair Hal Smalley summarized the proposal.

Bill visits with two relatively new breweries in Alaska's craft beer landscape — Resolution Brewing in Anchorage and Bearpaw River Brewing in Wasilla.

Today’s story are "Weird Parents," by Aurdrey wood, read by Mary Whybark, and two poems by Shel Silverstein, "Sick" and "Zebra Questions," read by Mandy Samuels.

Poor Thidwick's good manners get him into a host of trouble. Hear more as Sally Cassano reads, "Thidwick the Big-Hearted Moose," by Dr. Seuss.

Jenny Neyman/KDLL

July on the Kenai Peninsula means one thing to most people — fishing. Even if you don’t put a line in the water, it’s likely your friends, neighbors, co-workers or certainly the people in line ahead of you at the store do.

The Kenai National Wildlife Refuge Visitors Center has you covered this week.

“Fish week at the refuge is all about everything fish, so, not just fishing, but we started out on Tuesday talking about the anatomy of fish and what fish need to survive — so, habitat and what makes a healthy stream. Things like that,” said Leah Eskelin, park ranger with the visitors services department at the refuge.


Jenny Neyman/KDLL

The Kasilof River has been open to dip-netting since June 25. Newly expanded facilities and parking area on the north shore of the river mouth means easier access for dip-netters. Easier access means more visitors. And more people can mean more trash left behind.

That’s where the Stream Watch program comes in.

“If you’d like you can grab a bag and help yourself to cleaning up the roads or a little bit of the beach and the parking lot,” said Terese Schomogyi, a summer intern with the Kenai Watershed Forum’s Stream Watch program, which organizes volunteers to do restoration, protection and education programs along sensitive sections of waterways on the Kenai Peninsula.


Jenny Neyman/KDLL

The July rush is in full swing, with residents and visitors trying to cram in as much summer activity as possible. But one aspect of Kenai Peninsula life has been quieter than usual this year — wildfire season.


In this month's Drinking in the Last Frontier, get a taste of the latest brew at St. Elias, made with locally grown hops. And hop on over to your 'third place,' perhaps to try this month's beer style, the gueuze.

Llama Llama is having a week! He learns patience for chores with Mama and how to handle bullies at school in "Llama Llama Mad at Mama" and "Llama Llama and the Bully Goat," by Anna Dewdney, ready by Charlotte Zumbuhl.

Wild plants sometimes get a bad rap. When they’re pretty, we call them wildflowers. But usually, when they’re in our gardens without being intentionally planted, they’re weeds. And if they’re especially tenacious, like horsetail, they might get called even worse names.

But how often do we look at them as food or medicine? Tia Holley, an ethnobotanist who works in the wellness program at the Dena’ina Wellness Center in Kenai, gives us tips on how and what to pick locally.

Lemonade Day

Jun 11, 2018
Jenny Neyman/KDLL

June 9 was Lemonade Day on the central Kenai Peninsula, with over 30 young entrepreneurs operating their very own business for the day. KDLL visited with several stands in Soldotna:

Interviews and Lemonade Day stand locations:

Paxton and Silas, Key Bank

Ryder and Gunner, First American Title

Samuel, Sportsman’s Warehouse

Tenakee and Ryan, Wilderness Way

Raylee and Micah, Napa

Christopher and Kaden, Odie's

Ava and Zoe, Binkley Street

Aiden, 4D Building

Justine, Elise and Alana, Beemun's

Jenny Neyman/KDLL

It continues to be a slow, cold, soggy start to spring this May, but the gardening scene is heating up.

The Central Peninsula Garden Club is holding workshops every Saturday this month, giving gardeners a chance to pick the brains of experts on a variety of topics. Last week, KDLL tagged along for some sweet insight into growing berries at Alaska Berries farm and gathered snippits of information on tree pruning with Curtis Stigall of An Arboristic View.

Host Jenny Neyman interviews noted Alaska mountaineer Dave Hart about getting started climbing 30+ years ago, staying safe and what he's learned along the way.

Tag along with Dave up Redoubt, Iliamna, Torbert and Truuli peaks during a live photo presentation at 7 p.m. May 10 at the Kenai Visitors and Cultural Center. Admission is $5, or free for KDLL members.

Welcome to Tune-In Tales, storytelling for kids on KDLL. Our first episode, May 3, is "The Three Mooses Mosely," by Sally Cassano, performed by Sally, Sara and Truuli Hondel, Austin Thomas and Mike Gallagher. Enjoy!

Jenny Neyman/KDLL

It's April — the snow is melting but not fast enough to be gardening outside anytime soon. But that doesn’t mean you can’t be harvesting. Greenhouses get you a jump on spring and hydroponics can be a vault toward productivity. Tour Cheryl and Steve Beesun's hydroponic greenhouse in Soldotna, with cucumbers, lettuce and zucchini already ready to eat.

Elaine Howell

In the March episode of Drinking on the Last Frontier, Bill visits Country Liquor for a look at the retail craft of stocking unique beers and ponders brewery secession planning to see who will pick up the tab for breweries in the next generation. Plus, the magic of yeast in brewing science, the return of beer gear and the kick of coffee beers. Cheers!

Jenny Neyman/KDLL

Spring is in the air, if not quite evident on the ground yet. We’re at least a month from digging in the dirt but if you’re planning to grow or raise your own food this year, now is the time to get started — and we’re here to help. On this month's Kenai Garden Talk, we’ve got the buzz on beginner beekeeping, some tips for your chicks and a plea for pest patrol. And if you're fresh out of patience waiting for farmer's market season, there's now a mobile option on the Kenai Peninsula, bringing produce to a parking lot near you.

CES and KPB

Central Emergency Services in Soldotna is hoping to be a little less centrally located by building a new Station 1 on a larger lot with more room to grow.


Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities

It’s been over 40 years in the making, and will likely be a couple more before construction actually begins, but the Cooper Landing highway bypass project moved a significant step forward this week.


Patch up your waders and fish out your fishing line, because king salmon season is right around the corner. But make sure you’re aware of regulation changes before heading to the Kenai River this year.


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