Tamara Keith

If President Trump's first year in office seemed chaotic from a staffing perspective, there's a reason. Turnover among top-level staff in the Trump White House was off the charts, according to a new Brookings Institution report.

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President Trump is lashing out at his former chief strategist in the White House, Steve Bannon. In a written statement, Trump said, among other things, that Bannon has, in his words, lost his mind.

Updated on Dec. 28 at 10:37 a.m. ET

When President Trump was elected, conservatives weren't sure what they were going to get.

Some were worried that he wouldn't reliably adhere to their agenda. Others were turned off by his character, the tweets, the accusations of sexual misconduct. But there were those who pulled the lever for Trump anyway, figuring he would deliver more conservative policies than a President Hillary Clinton.

And deliver he has.

Updated at 11:02 p.m. ET

When President Trump signed the $1.5 trillion tax cut bill on Friday at the White House, he made a bold claim — that his "legislative approvals" were off the charts. "No. 1 in the history of our country," he said, citing 88 as the number of bills he had signed into law.

The actual number of laws Trump signed this year is 96. His claim of historic achievement isn't accurate, either.

But that didn't stop him from repeating the erroneous claim Wednesday during a visit with firefighters in West Palm Beach, Fla.

But what do these constant teases mean for the presidency?

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With a generous helping of exclamation points, ALL CAPS and spelling errors, 2017 was the first year of the first Twitter presidency. And in a way, President Trump's most popular tweets of the year tell the story of his presidency. These statements on Twitter gave Americans and the world an unprecedented real-time view of what Trump was thinking, stewing over and watching on cable.

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White House deputy national security adviser Dina Powell will resign from her position early next year, the first of what could be several departures expected around the one-year anniversary of President Trump's swearing-in.

Powell has been deeply involved in the Trump administration's Middle East policy and has accompanied him on his trips overseas, sitting in on meetings with world leaders and offering counsel.

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A young staff assistant is on the phone when her boss, a Republican senator, comes up behind her and kisses her on the neck.

"I was startled by that, finished the phone conversation, hung up the phone and turned and said to him, 'Don't you ever do that again,' " said Julie Williamson in a 1992 interview with Portland, Ore., television station KATU.

But it got worse from there.

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The allegations of sexual harassment against talk show host Charlie Rose that came out yesterday overshadowed another allegation. Prominent New York Times reporter Glenn Thrush was suspended after several women accused him.

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Special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation has entered the West Wing.

Mueller's team is charged with looking into whether anyone on President Trump's campaign worked with the Russians who attacked the 2016 election, so it was inevitable that investigators would want to talk with aides now working in the White House.

Some, like top adviser and son-in-law Jared Kushner, communications director Hope Hicks and policy adviser Stephen Miller, were key players in the campaign as well.

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In a ceremony at the White House today, President Trump declared the opioid crisis a nationwide public health emergency.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

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Less than a week before chief strategist Steve Bannon was axed from the White House President Trump said, "We'll see what happens with Mr. Bannon."

The day before announcing he wouldn't re-certify the Iran nuclear deal Trump told Sean Hannity on Fox News, "We will see what happens, pretty soon."

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President Trump did one of the most sensitive things required of a commander in chief on Tuesday. He called the widow of an American soldier recently killed in Niger to offer his condolences.

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