Sunday Puzzle: Mind your Ds and Ts

Oct 10, 2021
Originally published on October 10, 2021 8:24 am

On-air challenge: Every answer today is a word or phrase in which the only consonants are D and T, repeated as often as necessary. All the other letters are vowels.

Example: "Same here" --> DITTO

1. Was on a weight-loss regimen
2. Surpassed in accomplishment
3. Cry of achievement
4. Behaved obsequiously
5. Checked the financial records of
6. Having an uneven number of appendages on the foot
7. Insolent manner
8. Obsolete
9. Removed from an article intended for publication

Last week's challenge: This challenge came from listener Anthony Gray, of Bergen County, N.J. Write down the name of a country and its largest city, one after the other. Hidden in this string, in consecutive letters, is another country's capital (in six letters)? What is it?

Challenge answer: Pakistan + Karachi --> Ankara

Winner: Charley Parker from Exton, Pa.

This week's challenge: This week's challenge comes from listener Kerry Fowler, of Seattle. Name something you might eat for breakfast, in two words. Add a "G" at the end of the first word. Switch the middle two letters of the second word. Then reverse the order of the two words. You'll name an old-fashioned activity. What is it?

Submit Your Answer

If you know the answer to next week's challenge, submit it here by Thursday, Oct. 14, at 3 p.m. ET. Listeners who submit correct answers win a chance to play the on-air puzzle. Important: Include a phone number where we can reach you.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

It's time to play The Puzzle.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Joining us is Will Shortz. He's puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzlemaster.

Hi, Will.

WILL SHORTZ, BYLINE: Good morning, Lulu.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Will, can you remind us of last week's challenge?

SHORTZ: Yes, it came from listener Anthony Gray of Bergen County, N.J. I said write down the name of a country and its largest city, one after the other, and hidden in this string in consecutive letters is another country's capital. In six letters, what is it? Well, the country is Pakistan. Its largest city is Karachi, and hidden in that string of letters is Ankara, the capital of Turkey.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: We received 720 correct responses, and the winner is Charley Parker of Exton, Pa. Congratulations.

CHARLEY PARKER: Thank you.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: So, Charley, I understand this is not the first time Will has said your name on our air. Will, you might recognize our puzzle winner's name from a challenge a couple of weeks ago.

SHORTZ: Yeah, it was that clever Billy Joel, Billy Idol puzzle challenge from a few weeks ago. That was Charley's inspiration.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: So how'd you figure this one out?

PARKER: First, I got a site that gave all the countries and their capital cities, cut-and-pasted it into a Notepad file and whittled it down to six-letter capitals, hoping that it would jump out at me. Well, it didn't. So then I had to go back to the web and find a site that listed all the countries and their largest city and then painstakingly run through those until I found one that worked.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Cool. All right. Well, I think Charley's ready to play The Puzzle. Take it away.

SHORTZ: All right, Charley, every answer today is a word or phrase in which the only consonants are D and T, repeated as often as necessary. All the other letters are vowels. For example, if I gave you the clue, same here, you would say ditto - has a D and two Ts. Here's No. 1. We'll start with six-letter answers - was on a weight loss regimen.

PARKER: Dieted.

SHORTZ: Dieted is right. No. 2 - surpassed in accomplishment. Six letters.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: She blank herself.

SHORTZ: Yes.

PARKER: She outdid?

SHORTZ: Outdid, you got it - one T and two Ds. A cry of achievement - it's a three-word phrase.

PARKER: I did it.

SHORTZ: I did it. Yeah, I should've saved that for last. All right, now we go with seven-letter answers. And the first one is behaved obsequiously.

PARKER: (Unintelligible).

SHORTZ: It's based on a word more commonly heard as a five-letter noun. If you are obsequious to somebody and you do whatever they say, you are their...

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Ribbet.

PARKER: Ribbet. Toad?

SHORTZ: Yeah. Now put it in the past tense.

PARKER: OK - toadied.

SHORTZ: Toadied. Yeah, toadied - you got it. Checked the financial records of.

PARKER: Audit.

SHORTZ: Audited is it. Having an uneven number of appendages on the foot.

PARKER: Odd-toed?

SHORTZ: Odd-toed is it. Now we're going for eight-letter answers, and your first one is insolent manner. Someone who's insolent really has a...

PARKER: Attitude?

SHORTZ: Attitude is it. Obsolete?

PARKER: Out of date? Oh, no, no.

SHORTZ: Almost got it. That has an F in it.

PARKER: Outdated.

SHORTZ: Outdated is it. And your last one's a nine-letter answer - removed from an article intended for publication.

PARKER: Something edited or edited out.

SHORTZ: Edited out - you got it. Good job.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Good job. How do you feel?

PARKER: Relieved.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: You did really, really well. And for playing our puzzle today, you'll get a WEEKEND EDITION lapel pin, as well as puzzle books and games. You can read all about it at npr.org/puzzle. And Charley, which member station do you listen to?

PARKER: I've been a member of WHYY in Philadelphia since the '80s.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Charley Parker of Exton, Pa., thank you so much for playing The Puzzle.

PARKER: Thank you.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: All right, Will, what is next week's challenge?

SHORTZ: Yeah, it comes from listener Kerry Fowler of Seattle. Name something you might eat for breakfast in two words, add a G at the end of the first word, switch the middle two letters of the second word, then reverse the order of the two words, and you'll name an old-fashioned activity. What is it? So again, something you might eat for breakfast, two words, add a G at the end of the first word, switch the middle two letters of the second word, reverse the order of the two words, and you'll name an old-fashioned activity. What is it?

GARCIA-NAVARRO: When you have the answer, go to our website, npr.org/puzzle, and click on the submit your answer link. Remember, just one entry per person, please. Our deadline for entries is Thursday, October 14 at 3 p.m. Eastern. Don't forget to include a phone number where we can reach you at about that time, and if you're the winner, we'll give you a call. And if you pick up the phone - and I repeat, many of you have not been picking up the phone - you'll get to play on the air with the puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzlemaster, and his name is Will Shortz.

Thanks so much, Will.

SHORTZ: Thanks, Lulu.

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