berries

Elizabeth Earl

Alaska’s summer is short, but one of the ways it softens the farewell each fall is through a parting gift of delicious berries. In the late summer and early fall, Kenai Peninsula residents regularly flock to the wild lands for salmonberries, cranberries, blueberries, and crowberries and more.

Like everything, berry plants are being affected by the changes in the environment as climate change increases the temperature, lengthens the summer and, in many cases, dries it out. But according to University of Alaska Fairbanks researchers, the effect isn’t exactly clear-cut, nor directly in line with what you’d expect.

Jenny Neyman/KDLL

It continues to be a slow, cold, soggy start to spring this May, but the gardening scene is heating up.

The Central Peninsula Garden Club is holding workshops every Saturday this month, giving gardeners a chance to pick the brains of experts on a variety of topics. Last week, KDLL tagged along for some sweet insight into growing berries at Alaska Berries farm and gathered snippits of information on tree pruning with Curtis Stigall of An Arboristic View.