farmer's market

Sabine Poux/KDLL

A local food truck is expanding into a new market on old wheels. 

“We had been telling people for years, literally since we opened — Kenai needs ice cream. Period," said Aaron Conradt.


It makes sense that the Alaska Food Hub has done so well this year. The virtual farmers market uses the same sort of online delivery system that brick and mortar stores have adopted during the pandemic. It was COVID-safe before COVID even came into being.

In 2020, the Food Hub tripled its sales. And famers are reaping the benefits.


When you think of the value of farmers markets, what likely comes to mind is fresh, local produce, where you can meet the people who grew it just down the road from where it’s sold.

And, sure, it’s commerce, so there’s money involved. But shoppers might not be thinking about everything they’re supporting when they buy that zucchini or jar of jam.

In honor of Aug. 4 through 10 being national Farmers Market Week, let’s take a look at the economics of farmers markets.

Courtesy of the Kenai Soil and Water Conservation District

Saturday’s Harvest Moon Local Food Festival at Soldotna Creek Park fed on the area’s growing interest in eating locally.

“A lot of folks turned out. We’ve got a beautiful day, blue skies and lots of vendors, and it’s pretty lively,” said Heidi Chay, manager of the Kenai Soil and Water Conservation District and one of the organizers of the festival, which served as the culmination of a week of events celebrating local foods.

Jenny Neyman/KDLL

It's April — the snow is melting but not fast enough to be gardening outside anytime soon. But that doesn’t mean you can’t be harvesting. Greenhouses get you a jump on spring and hydroponics can be a vault toward productivity. Tour Cheryl and Steve Beesun's hydroponic greenhouse in Soldotna, with cucumbers, lettuce and zucchini already ready to eat.