Gardening

Farmers Almanac

New gardeners who sprouted green thumbs during the pandemic will soon face their first Kenai frost.

Night-time temperatures could dip into the high 20s this week in the Kenai-Soldotna area. For the scores of newbies who just started gardening during the pandemic, this might mean learning to clean up outdoor beds, bring plants inside and prep early for next spring.

Aspiring gardeners everywhere used this stay-at-home summer to get planting for the first time, with Alaskans especially reaping the benefits of the long summer days. Renae Wall, secretary of the Central Peninsula Garden Club, said there’s been increased activity in the club’s Facebook group, where local gardeners commiserate about the approaching cold and share advice about transitioning to fall.

“Really, the preparation is just dealing with all your harvest,” Wall said. “That’s the fun thing about talking to other gardeners, is finding out how they put away their harvests. You can do it in a root cellar, you can blanch and freeze, you can dry, you can pickle, there’s lots of different creative ways people do it and add their own variety.”

The plants are in the ground and produce is already popping up at Central Peninsula farmers' markets. During this special Spring 2019 Fundraiser program, host Jay Barrett talks with three local farmers about what it takes to grow such delicious bounty.

Join this month's Kenai Garden Talk to celebrate Alaska Agriculture Day, get a jump on local foods with a look at some spring harvestables and hear about an initiative to offer more agriculture opportunities in the Kenai Peninsula Borough.

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May 7 was Alaska Agriculture Day, celebrated the first Tuesday in May since 2007 to highlight the importance of home-grown sustainability in Alaska. Did you know that the Kenai Peninsula has more than 260 farms? And that total sales of Kenai Peninsula agricultural crops in 2017 was $5.4 million?

Today’s Tune-In Tales is a story celebrating Alaska Ag Day, read by Kenai Peninsula farmers, Lou Heite and Steve Dahl, of Eagle Glade Farms, in Nikiski.

Just when you thought it might be time to risk moving plants outdoors, freezing temperatures and even some snow flurries returned to prove that you can’t rush spring in Alaska.

But that doesn’t mean you can’t play in the dirt this time of year. This is prime seed-starting season. In this month's Kenai Garden Talk, we’ve got wisdom from veteran gardeners about how to start seeds efficiently and cost-effectively. After that, we’ll visit an asparagus farm down in Homer, proving that even persnickety crops can be successful on the peninsula with the right knowledge and care.

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