Homer Soil and Water Conservation District

Wikimedia Commons

While the Kenai Peninsula is relatively lucky that the ecosystems here are fairly intact, there are still a handful of invasive species making their way into the streams, fields and gardens here. In recent years, that’s accelerated due to climate change and people intentionally or unintentionally bringing in new species.

FWS

Alaska’s unforgiving climate once kept invasive species at bay.

Katherine Schake, of the Homer Soil and Water Conservation District, said that isn’t the case anymore.

Snow might still be on the ground but spring isn’t far away. When we get there, gardeners need to have their planting plans ready. Here’s some food for thought — growing native edible perennials. Local vegetables, if you will. Didn’t know there was such a thing? Shawn Jackinsky, of Green Cannon Gardens in Ninilchik, can tell you all about it. This is a “Know Your Lands” presentation from the Homer Soil and Water Conservation District. Find more of their presentations on their Facebook page.

Kenai Conversation: Invasive species

Nov 21, 2019

Longer, drier summers, teamed with shorter, warmer winters are giving invasive species better opportunities to gain a foothold on the Kenai Peninsula. On this week’s Kenai Conversation, we’ll learn about what species pose a threat, and why, with Katherine Schake from the Homer Soil and Water Conservation District, Borough Land Manager Marcus Mueller and Maura Schumacher, invasives specialist at the Kenai Watershed Forum.