salmon

In Cook Inlet salmon runs, increasing fish for one purpose means taking them away from another. On Tuesday, the Alaska Board of Fisheries passed a proposal intended to get more salmon into upper Cook Inlet streams, by restricting the commercial Central District drift fishery. 

The “conservation corridor” will be expanded, pushing the central drift fleet closer to shore to let more north-bound silver and sockeye salmon get to rivers in the Susitna drainage. 

“The highest user is the drift fleet, so, you know, we need to make up a little bit there and, unfortunately, I feel the highest user needs to come up with the change, I guess,” said Board member Fritz Johnson, from Dillingham.

Proposal 133 came from the Mat-Su Borough Fish and Wildlife Commission. That borough is stepping up advocacy for more fish allocation to Mat-Su streams, citing an economic analysis that sportfishing revenue has declined $150 million from 2007 to 2017. Board member John Wood, of Willow, championed that cause.

“I sit here and listen day after day after day about overescapement here and overescapement there. Please, someone show me in the entire Susitna basin where we have an overescapement issue. We don’t,” Wood said. “We’re just the opposite. If you want your most effective tool to minimize the northern-bound fish, this is it. If you want to help the Susitna rehabilitate those streams, this is the tool to do so." 

Cook Inlet Aquaculture Association

When the state Board of Fisheries meets in Seward next month, it will entertain a suite of proposals aimed at hatchery regulations. More than half a dozen proposals have been submitted and the deadline for comments on those proposals was Monday.


Anadromous work group to review habitat protection code

Nov 11, 2019

 

A new working group will review the Kenai Peninsula Borough’s code on habitat protection for anadromous streams. That section of code, last updated in some contentious votes in 2012 and 2013, called for a review every five years beginning in 2015.

 

 


The Alaska Department of Health recorded an unusually high number of cases this summer of a rare allergy-like condition related to unsafely handled fish.
    The condition is Scombroid Poisoning, and is usually associated with tuna, mackerel and mahi-mahi. But at least four of the seven victims of Scombroid reported eating salmon immediately before onset of symptoms. According to CDC figures, of 1,555 cases over the past 20 years, only 11 have been associated with salmon.

Commercial catches lagging behind in late sockeye run

Jul 29, 2019
United Cook Inlet Drift Association

 

Commercial fisheries in Upper Cook Inlet are also getting more time to harvest the late run of sockeye to the Kenai and Kasilof rivers.

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