Sen. Peter Micciche

KTOO file photo

Soldotna Rep. Sen. Peter Micciche is continuing his push to update the state’s alcohol laws while Soldotna Republican Rep. Ron Gillham has introduced several bills relating to COVID-19 vaccine objections and medications. That’s according to the first list of bills legislators filed ahead of the start of the spring session in Juneau.

KTOO file photo

Legislative staff in Juneau get tested for coronavirus every five days.

“It’s not an abnormal thing, we just go get tested," said Mary Jackson, a legislative staffer from Kenai.

Sabine Poux/KDLL

After over a year hiatus, the Silvertip Maintenance Station is up and running again.

Silvertip covers a 60-mile stretch of the Seward Highway, including Turnagain Pass. The state wrote the station out of its budget in 2019 but agreed to open it again in December following an outpouring of concern from commercial truck drivers, recreationists and Soldotna Republican Sen. Peter Micciche.

Gavel Alaska

Legislators are trying to figure out what the expiration of Alaska’s disaster declaration means for the state. 

Alaska has had disaster declarations in place since March. But the latest declaration expired this weekend when the Legislature could not organize in time to pass a bill and Gov. Mike Dunleavy did not take unilateral action to renew the order.

Sen. Peter Micciche's attempt to update the state's alcohol laws is starting yet another round through the legislative process. Will 2021 be the year it makes it to the finish line? Stay tuned to find out.
Plus, Bill chats with Lee Ellis, head of brewery operations at Midnight Sun Brewing Company and president of the Brewer's Guild of Alaska, and Jake Wade, operations manager of Bear Paw River Brewing in Wasilla.
Cheers!

Gavel Alaska

The Alaska Senate reconvened in Juneau today and unanimously chose Soldotna Republican Sen. Peter Micciche as its president.

 


Redoubt Reporter

Soldotna Republican Sen. Peter Micciche is again moving to establish a buyback program for set-net permits in Cook Inlet.

The program would reduce the number of commercial set-net fishermen on the east side of the inlet. Proponents of the bill, like Kenai Peninsula Fishermen’s Association Director Ken Coleman, say that’s to reduce pressure and create a more sustainable fishery in an area that’s been under stress for years.

“Our thought was if we could reduce our numbers, then those who would be left behind in a reduction scenario, assuming that some people would leave the fishing community, that those that are left behind would have a better chance for ongoing financial viability," he said.

Elizabeth Earl / KDLL

He looks like a lot of other soldiers. Shouldering his pack and carrying his gun, he looks out across Soldotna Creek Park from a pedestal beneath the flags, eyes on the horizon. A crowd greets him with applause and cheers.

Iron Mike, a statue representing soldiers and veterans of the U.S. military, was unveiled in the park on the Fourth of July, the culmination of nearly five years of anticipation. The Soldotna VFW post asked the city for permission to put the statue in the park and began raising money for it in 2015, and on Saturday, veterans pulled the tarp off for the final time.

Micciche eyeing more cuts as legislative session begins

Jan 20, 2020
AK Legislature

 

Senator Peter Micciche held a townhall meeting in Soldotna Thursday night, just ahead of the opening of the second session of the 31st state legislature.

 

Two of the Central Kenai Peninsula's three members of the Alaska Legislature called a couple of community meetings for Saturday. A packed meeting with residents concerned over state budget cuts to Wildwood Prison was held Saturday morning in the Kenai Peninsula Borough Assembly Chambers. In attendance were Rep. Ben Carpenter of Nikiski and Sen. Peter Micciche of Kenai.

Another meeting followed at noon for those concerned about fixing Senate Bill 91 from last session and the attack on education spending in the governor's budget. It had even more attendees.

Quick out as governor's Administration Commissioner

Jan 25, 2019

The man who once was the former chief of staff for Kenai Peninsula Borough Mayor Charlie Pierce, and political consultant for Sen. Peter Micciche's re-election campaign, has resigned his position in Gov. Mike Dunleavy’s administration after he was accused of lying to a Senate committee this week about his work experience.

John Quick was named as the state’s commissioner of the Department of Administration in late November. 

Peninsula pols split on PFD

Dec 7, 2018
Shaylon Cochran/KDLL

 

Now that elections have largely been settled across the state, the real fight over the state’s permanent fund can begin.

 

 


District 30 Alaska Republican Party

 

Despite just one name on the ballot for Senate District O, it’s at least a three-way race.

 

 

 


Senate race gains another write-in candidate

Oct 26, 2018
Willow King

The race for Senate District O has been one of the more turbulent on the Peninsula this election season. Senator Peter Micciche narrowly won the Republican primary in August. That prompted his challenger, Ron Gillham to launch a write-in campaign. And now, with less than two weeks until election day, another write-in candidate has thrown her hat in.


Leads flip in tight local House and Senate races

Aug 29, 2018

The close state house and senate races on the Kenai Peninsula are are yet to be certified, but the leads have flipped with the counting of absentee and questioned ballots.

Upset brewing in Senate O

Aug 22, 2018

In what appears to be a major upset in yesterday's primary elections in Senate District O, political newcomer Ron Gillham has defeated incumbent Sen. Peter Micciche.

With 100 percent of the precincts reporting, figures from the Alaska Division of Elections show Gillham pulled in 2,575 votes in the closed Republican primary for 50.12 percent of the 5,138 votes cast.

Micciche was close behind with 2,563 votes for 49.88 percent.

More law enforcement spending called for at town hall

Aug 7, 2018
Shaylon Cochran/KDLL

 

With the state of Alaska emerging from the financial doldrums brought by low oil prices, one area of the budget that may soon see more spending is law enforcement. That was the message residents had for Senator Peter Micciche at a town hall meeting in Kenai Monday night.

 

 


Jay Barrett/KDLL

Political signs have returned to Kenai Peninsula roadsides, blooming right on schedule between dandelions and orange hawkweed. By the time the fireweed has gone to seed, we'll be tired of them -- if they're still around.

Placing temporary signage is likely the most misunderstood and disobeyed law in Alaska. But there is one simple rule of campaign signs in the State of Alaska and it is this: If a campaign sign can be read from a state roadway, then it is illegal and should be taken down.

Kenai Conversation: Senator Peter Micciche

Jun 27, 2018

On this week's convesation, Medicare, PFDs, income tax and the continuing battle for better brewery laws. District O Senator Peter Micchiche talks with KDLL's Shaylon Cochran.

Interview highlights:

On changing the structure of how the Permanent Fund Dividend is distributed:

The slate is set for the state primary elections.

With Rep. Mike Chenault not seeking reelection, House Seat 29 is wide open, and has attracted three candidates, Shawn Butler of Hope running as a nonpartisan, and candidates Ben Carpenter and Wayne Ogle, both of Kenai, are running for the Republican nod.

Chenault gave up his house seat to run for Alaska governor, but his name does not appear on the state's final candidate list for that, or any, office.

One of the bills the Alaska Legislature passed in its flurry of activity to adjourn Saturday was a statewide workplace smoking ban. Starting Oct. 1, pretty much any place that people work, it will be illegal to smoke.

The measure, Senate Bill 63, had been held up for years by Anchorage Republican Rep. Gabrielle LeDoux. She finally let it pass out of committee Saturday, but only with a provision that allows communities to opt out of the regulations.

Cleaning up utility poles is a costly business. That’s at the heart of a senate bill that would absolve utility companies of liability if treated poles foul groundwater under state law. Federal liability laws would still apply.