Swan Lake fire

Even with recent snowfall, the Swan Lake fire will likely continue to smolder through the winter. On this week’s Kenai Conversation, we speak with fire managers from the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge and state Division of Forestry about how the fire was managed, how it’s being monitored during the winter, and what lessons were learned during the main event this summer. 

Take a look back at the Nov. 30, 2018, earthquake that shook Southcentral Alaska with Dan Nelson and Bud Sexton with the Kenai Peninsula Borough Office of Emergency Management. Find out what went well in that situation, what lessons were learned and how OEM is hoping to get the entire community involved in preparing for the next natural disaster.

 

This week, continuing to unpack the full costs of the Swan Lake Fire. Senator Peter Micciche got a meeting together this week with officials from an alphabet soup of local, state and federal agencies. They talked about how the plan to fight, or not fight the fire, unfolded and how those plans changed as conditions on the ground changed, or, didn’t change. It took months for fire dousing rains to return to the Kenai this fall. And until they did, a number of businesses that rely on access to the Kenai river, either directly or indirectly, suffered.

 

 


 

This week, continuing to count the costs of the Swan Lake fire.

 

 


        After a summer of fire closures, the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge is opening up personal use firewood collection starting on Tuesday.

Woodcutting will be permitting along Swan Lake, Swanson River and Funny River roads, within the Dolly Varden Campground, and the unburned areas within the Upper and Lower Skilak campgrounds.

All harvesting is limited to dead and downed trees within the designated areas, and no standing trees, dead or alive may be felled. No off-roading or ATVs are allowed.

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