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Kenai opens slash disposal site

Slash 1 -- poux.JPG
Sabine Poux
/
KDLL
Prior, there wasn't a borough or city facility to dump slash in Kenai.

Another spot to dump slash is now open, in Kenai.

Earlier this month, the city opened a site on the Kenai Spur Highway where people can dump spruce bark beetle trees and other logs, bark and branches they might have from logging on their properties. The city opened the site amid the ongoing beetle kill outbreak and the fire risk that outbreak poses.

Getting rid of slash is one way to mitigate wildfire risk, per the borough’s wildfire protection plan.

And while people can already take slash to Central Peninsula Landfill, in Soldotna, as well as the transfer facilities in Homer and Seward, slash is not allowed at the transfer facility in Kenai.

The new slash site is at milepost 13 of the Kenai Spur Highway in North Kenai. It’s open Thursdays through Sundays through October – or until the site is full. Its hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

The site is not open to commercial operators.

Sabine Poux is the news director at KDLL. Originally from New York, she's lived and reported in Argentina and Vermont, where she fell in love with local news. She covers all things central peninsula but is especially interested in stories related to energy and fishing. She'd love to hear your ideas at spoux@kdll.org.
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