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Zoom will pay $85 million to settle a lawsuit claiming it violated users' privacy rights, according to a preliminary settlement filed on Saturday. The class action suit by several Zoom users alleges the company shared personal data with Facebook, Google and LinkedIn, and allowed hackers to disrupt meetings with pornography, inappropriate language or other disturbing content in a practice called "Zoombombing."

Beginning in 1974, New Zealand police armed with dogs woke up Pacific Islanders who allegedly overstayed their visas at dawn, pushed them into police vans for questioning, then often deported them and placed their children in state care homes. The early morning operation became known as the "Dawn Raids."

Nearly 50 years later, New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern on Sunday formally apologized for those raids and the lasting hurt they have caused. Ardern expressed the government's "sorrow, remorse and regret" over the raids.

A Belarusian sprinter who spoke out publicly about the "negligence" of her Olympic coaches says she was allegedly taken against her wishes to the Tokyo airport for a flight back to Belarus.

Krystsina Tsimanouskaya, 24, told Reuters in an interview Sunday that she was pleading for help from Japanese police at the airport and "will not return to Belarus."

Florida reported 21,683 new cases of COVID-19 on Saturday, the state's highest one-day total since the start of the pandemic, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

TOKYO — Marcell Jacobs of Italy is the surprise victor of the fastest track race at the Tokyo Olympics, the men's 100 meter.

Jacobs beat his personal best time and put his star solidly on the map in the blazing fast race.

He was not well-known in the track world before today, making it to the semi-finals of this event in the 2019 World Athletics Championships.

After his victory, he gleefully hugged his teammate, high jumper Gianmarco Tamberi.

TOKYO — U.S. golfer Xander Schauffele won the Olympic men's individual stroke play competition Sunday. Schauffele sank key putts near the end of the final round while Japan's top golfer faded out of medal contention.

The 27-year-old clinched what he called the biggest win of his career with two pressure putts. On the 17th green, he sank a six-footer for birdie to break a tie with Rory Sabbatini, representing Slovakia. On the final green, Schauffele sank a 4-foot par putt to give him a one shot victory over Sabbatini.

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Third Planet Sci-Fi and Fantasy Superstore has sold comic books, toys and collectibles in Houston for over 40 years. Its blocky building is instantly recognizable thanks to its brilliant blue paint job.

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TOKYO — U.S. gymnast Sunisa Lee has taken bronze in the uneven bars event final at the Tokyo Olympics, adding another medal to her hugely successful Games.

Belgium's Nina Derwael took gold and Anastasiia Iliankova with the team from Russia took silver.

Lee, an 18-year-old from Minnesota, became the U.S.'s best hope for gold in the individual all-around competition when Simone Biles withdrew to focus on her mental health. Lee delivered strong routines in every apparatus, snagging the top award in individual gymnastics.

The uneven bars is her best event.

TOKYO — U.S. gymnast MyKayla Skinner has won a silver medal in the individual gymnastics final for the vault – a competition she wasn't expecting to take part in at the Tokyo Olympics.

Skinner, 24, was tapped to compete in the vault after Simone Biles, the greatest gymnast in the world, withdrew from the competition to focus on her mental health.

"I dedicate this medal to Simone. I wouldn't be here today if it wasn't for her," she said. "I told her I would be doing this one for her. She said, 'don't do it for me, do it for yourself', so technically it's for all of us."

When U.S. shot putter Raven Saunders is competing, she calls herself the "Hulk." It's the alter ego that bursts onto the field to fight for championships.

Saunders — with the help of her "Hulk" persona — took silver in the women's shot put final at the Tokyo Summer Olympics. She hurled the heavy ball 19.79 meters, or nearly 65 feet. It's the third medal ever for the U.S. in the women's event and it's Saunders' first.

Pockets of the American West continued to burn over the weekend, as another nine large fires were reported on Saturday in California, Idaho, Montana and Oregon.

The 87 fires still active in 13 states have consumed more than 1.7 million acres. Just shy of 3 million acres have been scorched since the start of 2021, with months left in what experts predict will be a devastating fire season.

Nigerian athlete Chioma Onyekwere, who had trained for years to hone her discus skills, considered competing at the Tokyo Games to be the pinnacle of her career.

"This is supposed to be one of the happiest moments of my life," she said.

Instead, because Nigerian athletic officials hadn't conducted enough drug tests over the past several months, Onyekwere and nine other Nigerians unexpectedly found themselves disqualified this week.

After removing herself from the women's team finals and the individual all-around competition, Simone Biles — America's most accomplished gymnast — announced late Friday she would not compete in the uneven bars or vault at the Tokyo games.

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And finally today, it's been five years since the music icon Prince suddenly and tragically passed away. In his Paisley Park studios, Prince left a literal vault filled with hundreds, if not thousands of unreleased songs and pieces of music. Now some of it is being released for the public to hear. "Welcome 2 America" is a collection of songs Prince had worked on in 2010.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "WELCOME 2 AMERICA")

PRINCE: Welcome to America, where you can fail at your job, get fired, rehired and get a $700 billion tip.

KELSEY SNELL, HOST:

And finally today, it's been five years since the music icon Prince suddenly and tragically passed away. In his Paisley Park studios, Prince left a literal vault filled with hundreds, if not thousands of unreleased songs and pieces of music. Now some of it is being released for the public to hear. "Welcome 2 America" is a collection of songs Prince had worked on in 2010.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "WELCOME 2 AMERICA")

PRINCE: Welcome to America, where you can fail at your job, get fired, rehired and get a $700 billion tip.

KELSEY SNELL, HOST:

And finally today, it's been five years since the music icon Prince suddenly and tragically passed away. In his Paisley Park studios, Prince left a literal vault filled with hundreds, if not thousands of unreleased songs and pieces of music. Now some of it is being released for the public to hear. "Welcome 2 America" is a collection of songs Prince had worked on in 2010.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "WELCOME 2 AMERICA")

PRINCE: Welcome to America, where you can fail at your job, get fired, rehired and get a $700 billion tip.

It feels good at the top, but Australian swimmer Kaylee McKeown knows it feels better when victory is shared.

The 20-year-old won her second Olympic gold medal, in the women's 200-meter backstroke final in Tokyo on Saturday.

McKeown's teammate, 29-year-old Emily Seebohm, came out with the bronze during the race. But during the medal ceremony, she didn't stay on the third step on the podium for long.

Records have been set nearly every day lately in Tokyo, but not all of them have been by athletes competing in the Olympics.

Japan's capital has exceeded 4,000 coronavirus infections for the first time — 4,058 cases, to be exact. That's a record high and nearly four times as many cases were reported just a week ago.

Since his arrival at the Olympic Village, tennis star Novak Djokovic has regaled fellow athletes with his techniques for mental strength, dealing with pressure, and "how to bounce back if you lost your focus."

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

MOSCOW — Darya Apakhonchich never considered herself a foreign agent.

She taught Russian to refugees in her hometown, St. Petersburg, and took part in street performances against militarism and violence against women. The activism of Apakhonchich's art group was quirky and local, and their performances typically got a couple of hundred views on YouTube.

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Claire Cottrill, who performs as Clairo, started making music when she was a teen. Her song "Pretty Girl" has over 75 million views on YouTube. And Clairo is a true Gen Z indie pop phenomenon.

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Elaine Thompson-Herah of Jamaica is officially the fastest woman in the world — again — after winning the 100 meters at the Tokyo Games in Olympic record time. She was the defending gold medalist in this event.

"I knew I had it in me, but obviously, I've had my ups and downs with injuries," she said Saturday, referring to a persistent ailment in 2018 and 2019. "I've been keeping faith all this time. It is amazing."

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