Jaclyn Diaz

A day after catastrophic levels of rain hit states from Maryland to Connecticut, areas affected by floods and tornadoes, the cleanup began.

Hurricane Ida's remnants brought historic levels of rain to the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic region Wednesday into Thursday. The storm killed at least 48 people across the region, according to official reports as of Friday morning.

Updated September 2, 2021 at 5:54 PM ET

The summer of wild weather continues.

Hurricane Ida's remnants brought catastrophic levels of rain to the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic on Wednesday into Thursday, triggering statewide emergencies as well as the first flash flood emergency issued for New York City.

Three days after Hurricane Ida blew through Louisiana, high floodwaters are still causing serious issues to recovery efforts in areas closest to the coastline.

Satellite images taken by Maxar on Tuesday shows just how extensive damage is over the Gulf Coast and southern Louisiana. The images are focused on the hard-hit small coastal towns that local officials say received the worst of the storm.

Updated September 1, 2021 at 12:48 PM ET

Legislation banning abortions after about six weeks is now the law of the land in Texas, effectively ending Roe v. Wade protections in the state.

Accidental gunshot deaths by children handling a gun jumped 31% during the start of the COVID-19 pandemic compared to a year earlier, new data shows.

There were 98 deaths that resulted from unintentional shootings by children from March through December 2019 compared to 128 over that same period in 2020, research by the advocacy group Everytown for Gun Safety shows.

And the trend continues to worsen during the pandemic, the groups says.

Hurricane Ida's fierce Category 4 winds and torrential rain left the Louisiana coastline badly beaten.

Images of the affected areas days after the storm show crushed homes, debris scattered across streets and flooded neighborhoods.

As cleanup is underway, officials are warning residents who evacuated not to return to their homes just yet because of the severe damage.

Heavy rainfall and catastrophic flooding events like those that hit Western Europe last month will be more frequent and intense due to climate change, a new scientific study says.

Life-threatening storm surges, heavy rainfall and hurricane-force winds are expected to hit Louisiana's coastline Sunday or early Monday, the National Hurricane Center warned.

Tropical Storm Ida was barreling toward the Gulf Coast and was forecast on Thursday to hit Louisiana as a Category 2 hurricane this weekend. The National Hurricane Center also issued a tropical storm watch for the Mississippi-Alabama border to the Alabama-Florida border.

Australian sheep farmer Ben Jackson was stuck at home, unable to attend his beloved aunt's funeral.

Coronavirus pandemic border closures in the country kept Jackson at home in Guyra in the state of New South Wales, more than 200 miles away from the funeral in Brisbane in Queensland. His aunt died after a two-year battle with cancer, reports The Guardian.

A Michigan man charged in federal court with plotting to kidnap Gov. Gretchen Whitmer was sentenced to six years and three months in prison, according to court records.

Ty Garbin, 25, is the only member of the six men facing federal charges in the kidnapping plot to plead guilty for his role. He also received three years of supervised release following his prison sentence.

The staff at the Kabul Small Animal Rescue has been working around the clock to pull off what feels like the impossible.

The mission? Fundraise at least $1.5 million for a cargo plane that can airlift more than 200 dogs and cats, the rescue organization's staff, and their families out of the capital safely — all in less than a week and while the Taliban are breathing down their necks.

Say it with me: Koe-mir'-na-tee.

Comirnaty, as it's known, is the official, brand name for Pfizer and BioNTech's COVID-19 vaccine. The Food and Drug Administration this week gave full approval to the vaccine for people 16 and older.

Conor Donahue says 1987 was the first year he remembers going to the store by himself to buy a 40 cent pack of Topps baseball cards.

Donahue, now an adult and the vice president of publicity for the Washington State Sports Collectors Association, has been collecting baseball cards since he was seven.

Now he says his collection is up to a "few thousand," he told NPR.

All of the memories, history, nostalgia, and sentimentality tied up in these small cards are closely aligned with the brand that made them — Topps, Donahue said.

The extent of the devastation in Haiti grows worse by the day.

The death toll following the 7.2-magnitude earthquake that struck the southwestern part of the island on Saturday has climbed to 1,941 and nearly 10,000 people were injured, according to official counts on Tuesday.

Haiti's Civil Protection Agency anticipates those figures will climb, noting that many people are still missing.

It happened again.

Over the weekend, Haiti was hit by a magnitude 7.2 earthquake that crumbled homes and buildings and killed more than 1,200 people.

Rescuers are still working to find survivors amid the rubble. The death count is expected to rise.

More than a decade ago, a similar quake left an estimated 220,000 dead, more than 1 million people displaced and roughly 300,000 injured.

Updated August 12, 2021 at 12:43 PM ET

Some 195 million Americans — out of a population of more than 330 million — are facing dangerously high temperatures, as much of the mainland U.S. is under excessive heat advisories beginning Thursday and expected to last until the weekend.

President Biden has nominated Damian Williams as his pick to lead the U.S. Attorney's Office for the Southern District of New York, one of the nation's most high-profile law enforcement departments.

If confirmed, Williams would be the first Black man to lead the prestigious office that covers Manhattan, the Bronx and areas north of New York City, including Westchester County.

Updated August 10, 2021 at 1:26 PM ET

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo has announced he will resign following a scathing report from the state's attorney general concluding the third-term Democrat sexually harassed 11 women, and in one instance, sought to retaliate against one of his accusers who went public with her allegations.

Norwegian Cruise Line can require that passengers show proof of a COVID-19 vaccination before boarding any of its ships in Florida, a federal judge has ruled.

The decision by U.S. District Judge Kathleen Williams in Miami to grant Norwegian's request for a preliminary injunction comes despite a state law passed in May that fines businesses that require proof of such vaccinations.

The law, championed by Gov. Ron DeSantis, slaps businesses with a fine of $5,000 per violation for asking customers to prove that they have been inoculated against the coronavirus.

Updated July 29, 2021 at 12:03 PM ET

Minnesota native Sunisa Lee, also known as Suni, is an 18-year-old high school graduate, but she is no stranger to facing immense pressure. And while she's risen to the tops of world gymnastics, she's still grounded in her home Hmong community.

The Justice Department on Tuesday night rejected a request by Alabama Republican Rep. Mo Brooks for legal protection in court against a lawsuit linking him to the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol.

Masks are again required for members of the House side of the U.S. Capitol amid a nationwide rise in coronavirus cases.

Under the reimplemented mandate, members, both vaccinated and unvaccinated, must wear a "well-fitted, medical grade, filtration face mask" in House office buildings, during meetings and while in the House chamber.

Under the order from Dr. Brian Monahan, Congress' attending physician, the new rule doesn't affect members of the Senate.

The return of masks in the House comes a month after the requirement was first lifted for vaccinated members.

Tobacco giant Philip Morris International says it will stop selling cigarettes in the United Kingdom within the next decade — including the company's iconic Marlboro brand.

"It will disappear," the company's CEO Jacek Olczak said in an interview with The Mail on Sunday. "The first choice for consumers is they should quit smoking. But if they don't, the second best choice is to let them switch to the better alternatives."

FirstEnergy Corp. has agreed to pay a $230 million fine for its central role in a bribery scheme — the goal of which was to get legislation passed that included a $1 billion bailout for two of its power plants in Ohio.

Federal prosecutors charged FirstEnergy, based in Akron, Ohio, with conspiring to commit honest services wire fraud.

An Ohio man federal prosecutors say is an "incel" was charged in federal court this week with attempting a hate crime for his plot to kill women.

Tres Genco, 21, was arrested Wednesday and is also facing charges related to illegally possessing a machine gun, according to the Justice Department.

Organizers of this year's Olympics in Tokyo are putting a new meaning behind "look, but don't touch."

The Games are ordinarily a place where many young athletes mix, mingle and, naturally, get very close.

In summer 2032, the world's largest sporting event will head to Brisbane, Australia.

The International Olympic Committee announced Wednesday in Tokyo that Australia will host the Summer Olympic games for the third time.

Brisbane will also host the Paralympic Games.

Adrian Schrinner, the lord mayor of Brisbane, said the effort to make Brisbane a host city began six years ago under his predecessor.

Americans desperate to leave the confines of their homes for a last-minute summer destination have a new option. Starting Aug. 9, Canada will reopen to fully-vaccinated Americans for non-essential travel after more than a year of closed borders between the two nations.

A month later, on Sept. 7, fully-vaccinated people from any country can travel to Canada for non-essential travel.

A devastating third wave of the coronavirus pandemic is hitting several countries in Southeast Asia as the delta variant takes hold in the region, leading to record levels of infections and death.

With Euro 2020 and the Stanley Cup in the books, the NBA Finals nearing an end, baseball past the All-Star break, and the Olympics a week away — sports are running full steam ahead, even as cases of COVID-19 tick up across the U.S.

Many stadiums and arenas in the U.S. have allowed fans to return at full capacity with many dropping mask requirements following a year of pandemic restrictions that prevented spectators and travel.

Plans for the Tokyo Olympics, which bring together athletes from around the world, are going ahead as scheduled next week.

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