budget

 

The Kenai Peninsula Borough School District is beginning its annual process to craft next year’s budget. That process has been marked in recent years by budget cuts from state, translating to staffing cuts in the district. Administrators remain optimistic for funding this year, but recognize the challenges they could face.

 


 

Kenai Peninsula College

 

Over the weekend, the state legislature was unable to come up with the votes to make any major changes to Governor Mike Dunleavy’s budget, or his plans to let certain funds revert back into state coffers. Those funds go to things like electric subsidies for rural Alaskans and scholarships for college students.

 


 

Office of Rep. Gary Knopp

 

That portion of the state legislature in Juneau for a special session was again unable to find the votes necessary to override Governor Mike Dunleavy’s vetoes. Roughly a third of the legislature met again at Wasilla Middle School. KDLL’s Shaylon Cochran spoke to Gary Knopp Friday afternoon, the Central Peninsula’s lone legislator in Juneau.

 

 


The Kenai Peninsula Borough Assembly unanimously adopted next year’s budget last night. Most of the work in terms of amending the proposed budget was taken care of over the previous two meetings, with much of the debate going into the funding of the so-called non-departmentals.

 

A number of state budget issues remain unresolved and layoffs for state employees or even a shutdown are possible if the legislature and the governor can’t come to an agreement soon. Kenai representative Gary Knopp spoke with KDLL’s Shaylon Cochran about what a special session might look like to address those and this session’s thorniest issue, the permanent fund dividend.

 

 


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