Stream Watch

Peter Micciche/Facebook

Every year, Alaskans flock to the Kenai and Kasilof rivers for a chance to scoop up some of the sockeye salmon that pack the estuaries on their way upriver to spawn. Many peninsula residents have mixed feelings about these fisheries, but one thing that's pretty clearly unpopular is the mess the fisheries often generate.

A photo of overflowing dumpsters at the mouth of the Kasilof River, near the personal use dipnet fishery, touched off angry debates on social media this week. The photo, taken Monday morning after a busy three-day holiday weekend loaded with beautiful weather and a healthy sockeye run to the Kasilof, shows four dumpsters packed to the brim with trash and more scattered across the pavement nearby.

Kenai Conversation: Stream Watch turns 25

Jan 4, 2019

Unfortunately, the Kenai Peninsula's healthiest river systems don't stay that way on their own. A key component to keeping rivers in good shape for fish and for us has been the Stream Watch program. Since 1994, Stream Watch volunteers have donated time to not only keeping things clean, but informing visitors of the right way to enjoy a day on the river.