Carrie Kahn

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A colorful cast of characters is on Sunday's ballot for the next president of Honduras.

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SAN JOSE, Costa Rica — Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega is running for a fourth consecutive term to remain leader of the Central American country in elections that critics and U.S. officials have labeled a "sham."

In the run-up to Sunday's election, Ortega, who turns 76 on Nov. 11, has jailed dozens of opponents, including seven people who said they wanted to challenge him for the presidency. Student leaders, businesspeople and journalists have been rounded up, and tens of thousands of Nicaraguans have gone into exile.

U.S. officials are reopening an international border crossing in southern Texas that had been closed for more than a week. The port of entry at Del Rio was closed after thousands of migrants set up camp below the international bridge crossing.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection issued a statement outlining plans to allow passenger traffic to resume at 4 p.m. local time Saturday. Officials say they expect to open the crossing for all cargo traffic on Monday at 8 a.m.

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The mayor of Del Rio, Texas, Bruno Lozano, expressed relief that thousands of migrants who were in his border city are no longer there.

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The U.S. pledged tens of millions more dollars to help Haiti recover from the August 14 earthquake that killed more than 2,000 people and left more than 12,000 injured. USAID Administrator Samantha Power was in Haiti today.

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A large sinkhole has been growing at a farm in Mexico since May. It's already swallowed a house, and two dogs had to be rescued from the hole last week.

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Updated June 6, 2021 at 5:32 PM ET

When Vice President Kamala Harris arrives in Guatemala on Sunday for her first foreign trip in office, she'll follow the same politically treacherous path President Joe Biden took when he was in the role. The mission: to help solve deep-seated problems driving tens of thousands of Central American people to try to seek asylum at the U.S-Mexico border.

"She is really picking up where then-Vice President Biden left off," said Symone Sanders, press secretary to Harris.

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MEXICO CITY — Mexicans go to the polls this Sunday in the largest elections Mexico has every held, in sheer numbers of posts to fill. This has also become one of the most violent campaign seasons. Organized crime gangs are mainly taking the blame for the killings of 35 candidates so far.

Every seat in the lower house of Mexico's Congress is in play, as well as nearly half of the country's governorships and thousands of mayoral and local legislative posts.

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Editor's note: The fight against disinformation has become a facet of nearly every story NPR international correspondents cover, from vaccine hesitancy to authoritarian governments spreading lies. This and other stories by correspondents around the globe focus on different tactics to combat disinformation, the impacts they've had and what other countries might learn from them.


MEXICO CITY — COVID-19 is ravaging Latin America, but one country, Nicaragua, insists it's tackling the pandemic better than any of its neighbors.

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Updated April 16, 2021 at 3:27 PM ET

A generation of Cuban revolutionaries who seized power more than six decades ago, directly challenging the U.S. and later pushing Washington and Moscow to the brink of nuclear war, is set to exit the stage.

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In Mexico, where less than 5% of the population has received a COVID-19 vaccine dose, the rich and well-connected have found a faster way to get their hands on one: travel north.

Some Mexicans with family ties or dual citizenship in the United States, or who just can afford the airfare, are heading to the U.S. to get vaccinated faster than the many months of waiting for one back home.

U.S. tourists aren't welcome in most countries around the world because of the high number of coronavirus cases surging in the United States. But at least one country is keeping its borders open: Mexico. And many Americans, keen to escape the cold or lockdowns, are flocking to its stunning beaches.

On a recent weekend in Cabo San Lucas, one of Mexico's top tourist destinations, Sharlea Watkins and her friends downed beers at a restaurant overlooking the city's marina.

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American tourists are not allowed in most countries right now, but Mexico is an exception. And people are going despite what the CDC says, which is, of course, don't do that. Here's NPR's Carrie Kahn.

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Artists and activists achieved something rare in Cuba. They held a peaceful protest. At first, it seemed the communist government would consider their demands for greater freedom of expression. NPR's Carrie Kahn reports on what happened next.

Mexico's president says he's not ready to send felicitaciones to President-elect Joe Biden, saying he wants to wait for U.S. authorities to certify Biden formally as the victor.

"We cannot meddle in the politics of other countries. ... We have to be respectful," President Andrés Manuel López Obrador said Monday at his regular morning news conference.

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Democratic lawmakers are demanding more information from the Trump administration about an incident in January in which U.S. agents working in Guatemala rounded up U.S.-bound Honduran migrants and transported them back to the Guatemala-Honduras border.

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