sport fishing

Sabine Poux/KDLL

Anglers on the Kasilof River can now only catch hatchery-produced kings. The Alaska Department of Fish and Game is restricting fishing on the river through the rest of the month, effective Thursday.

Sabine Poux/KDLL

The Ninilchik River is quiet Wednesday evening. But, listen closely and you’ll hear it — little anglers seeking fish as big as they are.

Cambria and Jonas Nations, of Nikiski, are casting where the ocean meets the river. It’s Youth-Only Fishery Day on the Ninilchik, and they’re looking for kings. At least, they will when they can settle whose line was caught in whose first.

 


Alaska fisheries more than three miles offshore fall under the purview of the North Pacific Fishery Management Council, a group of 11 voting members that makes policy decisions about the federal fisheries off the Alaska coast.

One of those council members is Seward’s Andy Mezirow. He was just appointed to his third three-year term by Gov. Mike Dunelavy. It’ll be his last, due to term limits. 


Redoubt Reporter file photo

July and August are the height of the Kenai River sportfishing season, but fishermen are going to have to work a little harder for their catches for the first couple weeks of August.

The Alaska Department of Fish and Game announced that bait and multiple hooks will be prohibited on the Kenai River from the mouth to the outlet of Skilak Lake starting Saturday at midnight. The change lasts through August 15.

ECON 919 - Declaring the 2018 fishing season a disaster

Nov 30, 2018

 

The 2018 fishing season didn’t leave many positives to look back on, and in fact, presented some new challenges. The borough assembly joined the city of Kenai and the city of Homer in requesting a formal disaster declaration for the 2018 salmon season, including commercial and sport fisheries and related businesses.

 

 


With all the closures and restrictions lately, one wouldn’t be blamed if they thought there were no more angling opportunities in the central Kenai Peninsula. But they'd be wrong.

First of all, dip-netting is still open at the mouth of the Kasilof River, with just a couple caveats: One, any king salmon caught must be immediately returned to the water, and two, the fishery is for Alaska residents only. Other than that, Fish and Game says dip-netting success on the Kasilof remains good.

Sport fishing for early-run king salmon on the Kenai River is reported to be fair and improving, which is a marked improvement over the situation from the freshwater fishing report from Fish and Game last week.

According to this week's report, the water remains relatively clear, but some moss and debris are fouling lures and lines.