Peter Breslow

Two-time Peabody Award-winner Peter Breslow is a senior producer for NPR's newsmagazine Weekend Edition. He has been with the program since 1992. Prior to that, he was a producer for NPR's All Things Considered.

Breslow has reported and produced from around the country and the world --from Mt. Everest to the South Pole. During his career he has covered conflicts in close to a dozen countries, had his microphone splattered with rattlesnake venom, and played hockey underwater. For six years, he was the supervising senior producer of Weekend Edition Saturday, managing that program's news coverage.

Over the years, Breslow has been honored with three Overseas Press Club awards: 1989 for "Homecoming: Return to Vietnam," 1998 for "Israel at 50," and 1999 for NPR's Kosovo coverage. Among his other awards are a share of the 2002 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award for NPR's coverage of Sept. 11 and the war in Afghanistan, and the 2003 duPont-Columbia Award for NPR's coverage of the war in Iraq. He also received a William Benton Fellowship in Broadcast Journalism from the University of Chicago.

In 1988, Breslow won a coveted Peabody Award for his series of reports, "Cowboys on Everest." Microphone in hand, he joined members of the Wyoming Centennial Expedition as they scaled the snow and ice up 23,000 feet on Mount Everest's North Ridge. He was also part of the NPR team that was awarded a Peabody in 2014 for coverage of the Ebola epidemic in Africa.

A native of River Edge, New Jersey, Breslow plays the harmonica, worships Muddy Waters, is a graduate of the University of Massachusetts, and an Eagle Scout.

The first sign that something was wrong came with stomach pains. It was April 30, and 9-year-old Kyree McBride wasn't feeling well.

His mother, Tammie Hairston, thought it might have been something that he ate. But soon, young McBride was battling a 102-degree fever.

Worried he may have contracted the coronavirus, Hairston took her son to the hospital. "It was a quick in and out of the emergency room," she said. Doctors told her to take him home and monitor him.

The old way to think about your dog's "human age" — the age in actual years times seven — is wrong. And researchers now have a new formula they think will calculate your dog's age more accurately.

Simply put, compared with humans, dogs age very quickly at first, but then their aging slows down, a lot.

Trey Ideker of the University of California, San Diego was part of a team of researchers that looked at aging on the molecular level.

What did a meal taste like nearly 4,000 years ago in ancient Babylonia? Pretty good, according to a team of international scholars who have deciphered and are re-creating what are considered to be the world's oldest-known culinary recipes.

The recipes were inscribed on ancient Babylonian tablets that researchers have known about since early in the 20th century but that were not properly translated until the end of the century.

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