Peter Breslow

Two-time Peabody Award-winner Peter Breslow is a senior producer for NPR's newsmagazine Weekend Edition. He has been with the program since 1992. Prior to that, he was a producer for NPR's All Things Considered.

Breslow has reported and produced from around the country and the world --from Mt. Everest to the South Pole. During his career he has covered conflicts in close to a dozen countries, had his microphone splattered with rattlesnake venom, and played hockey underwater. For six years, he was the supervising senior producer of Weekend Edition Saturday, managing that program's news coverage.

Over the years, Breslow has been honored with three Overseas Press Club awards: 1989 for "Homecoming: Return to Vietnam," 1998 for "Israel at 50," and 1999 for NPR's Kosovo coverage. Among his other awards are a share of the 2002 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award for NPR's coverage of Sept. 11 and the war in Afghanistan, and the 2003 duPont-Columbia Award for NPR's coverage of the war in Iraq. He also received a William Benton Fellowship in Broadcast Journalism from the University of Chicago.

In 1988, Breslow won a coveted Peabody Award for his series of reports, "Cowboys on Everest." Microphone in hand, he joined members of the Wyoming Centennial Expedition as they scaled the snow and ice up 23,000 feet on Mount Everest's North Ridge. He was also part of the NPR team that was awarded a Peabody in 2014 for coverage of the Ebola epidemic in Africa.

A native of River Edge, New Jersey, Breslow plays the harmonica, worships Muddy Waters, is a graduate of the University of Massachusetts, and an Eagle Scout.

Louis Armstrong has served as the focus of many works of literature. Now, a few seconds of old film that appear to feature Armstrong as a teenage boy have captivated jazz journalist James Karst. If Karst's theory is correct, the clip from 1915 shows Armstrong at a turning point in his early life — years before he became famous and eventually legendary around the world.

A new generation of migrants is arriving in Mexico: young adults who were born in Mexico, raised in the United States and are now returning — some voluntarily, some by force — to the country of their birth. They've been dubbed "Generation 1.5."

With only limited support available from the Mexican government for these often well-educated returnees, several nongovernmental organizations and at least one private company are looking to help them out and take advantage of their skills.

When 29-year-old Gilberto Olivas-Bejarano first returned to his birth country of Mexico, he didn't speak the native language.

"I barely speak Spanish now," he says.

He arrived in León alone, and today, nearly two years since his deportation, Olivas-Bejarano has still not seen his parents or siblings in person.

On a sunny, late-September afternoon in the garden of a guesthouse in Kabul, just beyond the armed guard at the iron gate, a couple of girls are tuning up for guitar practice. All headscarves and concentration, they stretch tentative fingers along the strings. Their teacher, a 56-year-old musician from Los Angeles named Lanny Cordola, sports own head covering, a green doo-rag holding in check a graying ponytail that drifts down the middle of his back.