Sabine Poux

Reporter/evening news host
Avery Lill/KDLG

 Two long-awaited changes at the Kenai Airport are landing this fall. Ravn Alaska is expected to resume service under its new owners in less than two weeks and the airport will cut the ribbon on its two-year terminal remodel mid-November.

Ravn’s return has been a long time coming. The air carrier, now under FLOAT Shuttle, Inc., recently re-entered an airport lease agreement with the city, following its bankruptcy under previous owners this summer.  But it was still working out the details on when it would restart service, pending approval from the Federal Airline Administration and Department of Transportation.

The airline received approval from the FAA Tuesday. Kenai Airport Manager Mary Bondurant says that’s when she heard about Ravn’s new timeline.

Central Peninsula Hospital

 A visiting urogynecologist is in town this week to help women who are dealing with pelvic floor disorders. Dr. Michael Carley is based out of Dallas, Texas, but spends a week at Central Peninsula Hospital every three months to see patients for a variety of related conditions.

“I’m a urogynecologist, so the main conditions I treat are conditions in women that include what we call ‘pelvic floor disorders,’ or pelvic floor defects,” Carley said. “So the main problems I treat are urinary incontinence, where women lose urine. I also treat problems with pelvic organ prolapse. I also do treat fecal incontinence.”

Urogynecology is a subspecialty of gynecology that isn’t all that common locally. Alaska has two board-certified urogynecologists, both based at Providence Medical Center in Anchorage. 

This year’s commercial salmon harvest was bad. Really bad.

The harvest in Upper Cook Inlet was reportedly the lowest since 1971, with drift gillnet and east side setnet harvests 86 percent lower than their respective recent 10-year averages. On top of that, the price for sockeye salmon paled in comparison with recent years.

That burden hits close to home for a lot of Kenai Peninsula fishermen. At the Kenai Peninsula Borough Assembly meeting Tuesday, representatives from the United Cook Inlet Drift Association and Kenai Peninsula Fishermen's Association called on the assembly to request that the state of Alaska declare an economic disaster for Upper Cook Inlet commercial salmon fisheries. 

Census.gov

Tim Dillon, the executive director of the Kenai Peninsula Economic Development District and the borough’s census coordinator, thought he had until the end of the month for a final census push. Now that deadline is today, due to a Supreme Court ruling to end counting early.

That’s complicated a process that was already made difficult by the pandemic.

“It’s kind of left us in a scramble,” Dillon said. It’s been so difficult this past year with COVID and the starting and stopping and everything and it’s really been pretty bizarre.”

KPB Alerts

The Kenai Peninsula Borough Assembly voted to cover the $250,000 used by the borough to mitigate floods in Seward earlier this month.

Borough Mayor Charlie Pierce issued an emergency disaster declaration Oct. 2 when heavy rainfall from the day before caused flooding on the eastern peninsula, creating a large load of sediment that damaged borough-maintained roads. Among the damaged areas were Dieckgraeff Road, a gravel road that is the only pathway to the borough’s solid waste transport facility in the Seward-Bear Creek area, as well as two subdivisions.

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