Jenny Neyman

General Manager

Jenny Neyman has been the general manager of KDLL since 2017. Before that she was a reporter and the Morning Edition host at KDLL.
She also worked in print journalism for 15 years, including 7.5 years as owner, publisher and editor of the Redoubt Reporter community newspaper in the central Kenai Peninsula.
She holds a bachelor's degree in journalism from Whitworth University in Spokane, WA, and grew up listening to KSTK public radio in Wrangell, AK.

Soldotna Chamber of Commerce

Join host Bill Howell on this month’s Drinking on the Last Frontier for a report from Frozen River Fest, a visit with Gakona Brewing Company and an apples-to-pears comparison of ciders and perries. Cheers!

Of course Betty Bunny didn't do it — the Tooth Fairy did! At least that's who the preschooler uses as her scapegoat as she tries to wriggle her way out of trouble. Sharon Mosbrucker ready "Betty Bunny Didn't Do It," by Michael Kaplan.

Follow Winston, a baby goat, as he explores the farm to find a friend of his very own. Winston meets several barn yard friends before finding his perfect match. By Whitney C. Owens, read by Sharon Mosbrucker.

CJ can't understand how his grandma "finds beautiful" wherever she looks, until he opens his eyes and his heart. Sally Cassano reads "Last Stop on Market Street," by Matt de la Peña.

courtesy Kenai Peninsula Borough

The George A. Navarre Borough Building in Soldotna has gained another distinguished name. In a ceremony before the assembly meeting Tuesday the assembly chambers were named for Betty J. Glick.

The designation honors a woman who has been involved in public service virtually since moving to the Kenai Peninsula in the early 1960s.

Max Best, director of the borough’s Planning Department, was one of several well-wishers at the ceremony Tuesday.

“I want to thank you from our family to yours and for your selflessness and your family’s commitment to your public service and everything you did, setting a gold standard that all of us need to follow,” Best said.


Courtesy Jenny Neyman/Redoubt Reporter

Anybody who grew up 30, 20, even 10 years ago, would know a library as a place for quiet reading and study, whispered conversations and stern looks for causing any sort of disturbance, no food or drink, no music outside of headphones, no video games or messy art activities. And certainly no running.

Those libraries are a thing of the past.

“This last Friday we had live-action Pac Man tag, which is exactly what it sounds like — they pretend to be characters from the videogame Pac Man and they chase each other throughout the library after hours. Which is a lot of fun to be in a space that usually you need to be very quiet, and they get to really be themselves,” said Rachel Nash, director of the Soldotna Library.

The library celebrates five years since its building expansion with a party from 4 to 5 p.m. Friday in the community room. The original facility, built in the early 1970s, was a constrained, and, yes, pretty quiet place. The expanding role of community libraries got too big for the cramped space.


The Kenai Peninsula Borough began its budget process Wednesday, with managers and directors meeting to discuss departmental finances. At the borough assembly meeting Tuesday night, Mayor Charlie Pierce warned that there are some complications going into this budget cycle.

For one thing, he doesn’t expect any extra help from the state.

While the Kenai Peninsula Borough survived the Nov. 30, 7.0 earthquake and subsequent aftershocks in rosy condition compared to Anchorage and areas of the Matanuska-Susitna Borough, it didn’t escape unscathed. Damage reports are still coming in and the repair bills are adding up.

The borough assembly will see an ordinance at its meeting Tuesday asking to appropriate $450,000 to cover repair and inspection costs already incurred and more yet to come.

Megan Weston, Jen Luten, Forrest Cohn, Scott Davis, Jill Davis, Jenny Neyman and Noah Procter share True Tales, Told Live on the theme "Risky rusiness — tales of taking the leap." Recorded Nov. 16 at Odie's Deli in Soldotna.

The next True Tales event is Feb. 1 on the theme, "Sibling rivalry — the ties that bind and blindside. Want to tell a story? Contact organizers through True Tales, Told Live on Facebook, or contact Jenny at jneyman@kdll.org or 907-283-8433.

Join Bill this month for a beer year in review, preview of Alaska Beer Week and a look at the history and future of brewing in Skagway. Cheers!

Many thanks to Nelson Kempf and Keeley Boyle for performing live in the studio for our Fall Membership Drive. You can find their music on iTunes (and in the audio file below).
 

A Central Kenai Peninsula League of Women Voters forum Thursday night in Soldotna gave supporters and opponents of Ballot Measure 1 a chance to explain their perspectives and dispel misconceptions about the measure that would expand permitting and protections for anadromous fish habitat in Alaska.

Kaitlin Vadla and Laura Rhyner, with Cook InletKeeper, spoke for the Stand for Salmon side supporting the voter imitative, while Owen Phillips and Linda Hutchings, of Soldotna, represented the Stand for Alaska movement that opposes the measure.

The panel spoke to a full house in assembly chambers at the borough building in Soldotna and covered a lot of ground. Among the questions was what myth each panelist wants to dispel about the measure.


Many thanks to Sue Biggs, Vickie Tinker and Jack Willl, who joined us in the studio to play live for the KDLL Fall Membership Drive.

Thanks to Aiden, Heidi, Zoe, Mikey and Vail, fifth-graders at Kaleidoscope School of Arts and Science in Kenai, for reading our Tune-In Tale this week, “The Day the Crayons Quit,” by Drew Daywalt, illustrated by Oliver Jeffers.

Jenny Neyman/KDLL

Where there's smoke there's good beer flavor and let's hear it for the women in brewing history. Bill also checks in with Bleeding Heart Brewery in Palmer and get details about the Cooper Landing's plans to build a new brewery.

Wiki Commons

A race for the school board in Sterling and Funny River is one of the most contested in the upcoming municipal election. Four people are vying for that one seat.


Wiki Commons

The District 2 — Kenai seat of the Kenai Peninsula Borough Board of Education is up for election. Incumbent Tim Navarre faces challenger Matt Morse.

Navarre has held his school district seat since 2009, is also currently on the Kenai City Council, has served on the Kenai Peninsula Borough Assembly and was the chief of staff under borough Mayor John Williams. He is vice president of the family’s business, Zan, Inc., which owns the local Arby’s restaurants.

Morse graduated from Kenai Central High School, went off to college in Fairbanks and returned to Kenai to work in the family business, Partner Management Recruiters South Central Alaska.


Election coverage continues on the Kenai Conversation. Host Jenny Neyman visits with candidates for the Kenai Peninsula Borough School District Board of Education. In District 2 — Kenai, Matt Morse is running against incumbent Tim Navarre. In District 5 — Sterling/Funny River, incumbent Marty Anderson has three challengers — Nissa Fowler, Greg Madden and Karyn Griffin. Anderson is out of state for work and was not able to participate, and attempts to reach Griffin have not been successful.

Hurricane Florence has an unintended impact this week — a planned, nationwide emergency alert system test is being postponed to not confuse people during ongoing response efforts in the Carolinas.  

Thursday was supposed to be the day for a test of the nationwide Integrated Public Alert and Warning System. This includes the Emergency Alert System, which makes those test tones you hear periodically on TV and radio stations — including KDLL, and Wireless Emergency Alerts, which sends alert messages to cell phones.

Courtesy of the Kenai Soil and Water Conservation District

Saturday’s Harvest Moon Local Food Festival at Soldotna Creek Park fed on the area’s growing interest in eating locally.

“A lot of folks turned out. We’ve got a beautiful day, blue skies and lots of vendors, and it’s pretty lively,” said Heidi Chay, manager of the Kenai Soil and Water Conservation District and one of the organizers of the festival, which served as the culmination of a week of events celebrating local foods.

Jenny Neyman/KDLL

How far back does your memory of Soldotna go? Do you recall the old two-lane Sterling Highway bridge over the Kenai River, before the current one was finished in 2007? How about the one before that, started in 1948, when the Alaska Road Commission was just beginning to push the Sterling Highway on toward Kasilof?

Al Hershberger does. That first bridge is what brought him to Soldotna.

Shel Silverstein delights with a selection of poems: “The Googies Are Coming,” read by Anya Hondel, “Hug of War,” read by Skylar Lyon, “Zebra Questions,” read by Mandy Samuels, and “Help,” read by Anya Hondel. After that, it’s “Have I got dogs,” by William Cole, read by Mary Whybark.

Courtesy Soldotna Chamber of Commerce

Alaska seniors and their families, caregivers and service providers have a chance today to let the state know about issues affecting older Alaskans.

The Alaska Commission on Aging is holding a rural outreach meeting in Nome, but along with that, there’s a listening session held by teleconference from 10 a.m. to 1:15 pm today to hear from all over the state.

On the Kenai Peninsula, the Soldotna Senior Center is set up as a teleconference site.

“We’ve got a teleconference set up that we’ll hook up in our game room and anybody that wishes to listen in or speak should be able to through that teleconference line. Topics possible to be discussed are along-t support services, senior housing, elder protection, financial security, healthy aging and identifying community strengths and challenges,” said John Walker, director of the senior center.

The Kenai Peninsula Borough School District Board of Education looked out at a sea of red in its meeting in Homer on Monday night. Over a hundred teachers and support staff, who are seeing red over unresolved contract negotiations, wore red to the meeting and spoke out about their concerns.

Negotiations for a contract that was supposed to go into effect this school year began in February but have yet to be resolved. The school district and associations representing teachers and support staff went through an unsuccessful round of mediation and now are moving to arbitration. Dave Brighton, president of the Kenai Peninsula Education Association, says it’s been about a decade since a round of negotiations finished on time and without needing outside adjudication.

“I don’t know why it is that every time we go to the negotiations table we end up going all the way through mediation and then arbitration,” Brighton said. “I can’t remember a contract that we’ve had that didn’t go through that. I’m asking you guys to encourage the school district to come to the negotiation table to bargain.”


Feeling a little sluggish? "Score One for the Sloths" will make you feel great about your level of motivation. Story by Helen Lester, read by Mandy Samuels.

Jenny Neyman/KDLL

Dave Ianson thinks rhubarb could be the next big thing in Alaska agriculture, if only growers would show it a little love.

And if you're thinking about raising dairy goats, make sure you plan ahead so your experience doesn't turn sour.

Links from this episode:

Karluk Acres, Julie Wendt and& Paul Vass:

Phone: 907-252-3980

Website: www.karlukacres.com

Facebook: Karluk Acres

Courtesy Soldotna Rotary

This month, Bill reports from the eighth annual Kenai Peninsula Beer Festival and compares the craft brewing industry in Maine vs. Alaska.

Courtest USDA

There’s an experiment growing in the borough’s gravel pit in Cooper Landing and it’s ready for harvest.

“There was a project about two years ago that result in an area being reclaimed. And so we had this nice, flat surface that was freshly top-soiled, and we’re looking at what to do with it in the long term. And for a temporary measure, we did some barley trials,” said Marcus Meuller, land management officer for the Kenai Peninsula Borough.

Meuller said the department has been working toward an agriculture initiative to find ways to use borough land to make agriculture more available for residents, and the barley experiment fits right in.


KPBSD

Let’s get a little awkward, shall we, and discuss the birds and the bees. At least, the teaching of the birds and the bees, which has become a little more cumbersome since the passage of the Alaska Safe School Act. HB 156 went into effect in 2017 and requires school boards to review and approve outside presenters and materials used to teach sex ed, and grants parents the ability to opt their student out of any curriculum area or assessment.

Not all outside presenters and materials have to be approved by the school board. Historians, scientists, poets and so on, are still fine, only those teaching human reproduction. HB 156 had a controversial path into law. Some saw it as an attempt to limit sex ed, in a state where rates of sexually transmitted diseases and teen pregnancies rank among the highest in the nation. Others argued the additional scrutiny was a way to raise awareness and get parents and communities more involved in curriculum.

The Kenai Peninsula Borough’s school board had its yearly review of supplemental sex ed materials at its Aug. 6 meeting.


Emily Kwong/KCAW

Opioids like heroin affect the part of the brain that regulates breathing. An overdose depresses respiration to dangerous levels. Minutes, and even seconds, count in treating an overdose.

That’s why the U.S. Surgeon General is advocating greater awareness of the opioid antidote Naloxone, sold under its brand name, Narcan, which can counteract the effects of an overdose almost immediately.

Dr. Jerome Adams visited Kenai last week and sang the praises of Project Hope, a state program that provides Narcan kits to the public.

“First responders can’t typically get there in the four minutes it takes to get a hypoxic brain injury,” Adams said. “So if we want to turn around this opioid epidemic, if we want to avoid losing a generation, we need more people willing to carry naloxone with them, keep it in their homes. Because anyone can find themselves in the position to be first a responder.”


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