Kenai Conversation

Live, call-in public affairs interviews. Call 907-283-8433 to join the Conversation.

Travel was one of the first things to go last March, sending students who were on the Kenai Peninsula for foreign exchange — and their counterparts from Kenai who were abroad — packing.

But some programs are coming back in 2021. Our guests are Mitch Michaud with the Congress-Bundestag Youth Exchange program, in conjunction with Kenai Peninsula College; Eileen Bryson with the local chapter of the American Field Service; and Will Morrow with the Soldotna Rotary Club's exchange program.

The worlds of music and performance have been disrupted in the last year. But it looks like we’re on the upswing. People are getting vaccinated, the Wednesday market will have live shows and people are getting jazzed to see their favorite bands again.

Our guests today are all Kenai Peninsula-based musicians: Sue Biggs, Jack Will, Nelson Kempf and Robert Carlson.

Scientists have been scrambling for the last year and a half to wrap their heads around the risk posed by a potentially massive landslide on the steep slopes of Barry Arm in Prince William Sound. In a worst-case scenario a full slope failure could pummel Whittier with a tsunami wave as big as 30 feet.

State and federal researchers are working to get a better understanding of the size and factors that might cause the slope to fail, to help tsunami forecasters give boaters and coastal communities in the sound as much advance warning as possible.

Solid waste, recycling and composting  are up for discussion with the Kenai Peninsula Borough Resilience and Security Advisory Commission Solid Waste Committee members, Randy Arndt and Alexandra Ravelo, as well as Dan Kort, Solid Waste Director at Central Peninsula Landfill.

To find out more about the Resilience and Security Commission, access links to their meetings and contact the commission members go the the KPB website.

The Kachemak Bay Science Conference and Kenai Peninsula Fish Habitat Symposium will be held March 15 to 18. They’re virtual this year and free to attend. To register and to find out more, visit kachemakbayscience.org, or listen to this week’s interview with conference organizers and presenters.

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